13/11/2018 Shroud on CNN

Mountain glaciers have been retreating since the end of the ice age but the dramatic melt in recent decades is a strong indicator of human-induced climate change. In Valais, Switzerland a man-made ice grotto carved into the Rhône Glacier has been a popular tourist destination for more than a century, but the glacier is retreating. So, for the last 20 years, this local enterprise has been covered in fabric to protect it from the sun. Watch Simon Norfolk and Klaus Thymann’s collaborative art project called Shroud featured in this mini-doc for CNN/Beme News.

18/10/2018 Adidas Terrex + Emma Stibbon

The glaciers in Ecuador are receding due to climate change. We look at mountains and panoramas and we assume our surroundings are immutable and resilient, when we are in fact experiencing a rapid change in Earth’s landscapes.

Project Pressure is collaborating with Emma Stibbon to see how she as an artist creates work inspired by the changing environment. With the glaciated sites in Ecuador Stibbon felt she wanted to say something about the extraordinary scenery but also point to the poignancy of the fact that the changes in the landscape will be witnessed within her own lifetime.

The team travelled to Ecuador visiting multiple glaciers at high altitudes up to 5100 m where Stibbon created sketches and collected soil that was used to make pigment for the drawings she created in her studio upon returning.

The “A Blank Canvas” project was made possible through a collaboration with Adidas TERREX.

Klaus Thymann wrote and directed the film as well as created the still images.

 

 

21/09/2018 Tarfala Valley

Project Pressure developed a new way of visualising the changes in glacier landscapes through photography in collaboration with Dutch film company PostPanic and geologist Erik Schytt Holmlund.

By sourcing images from 1946, 1959, 1980, 2008 and 2017 of the Tarfala Valley and the Kebnekaise mountain in Sweden, the team created 3D models of these landscapes through photogrammetry. Throughout the video, viewers can see the landscape fade in and out with each year. As the video progresses into more recent times, the devastating impact humans continue to have on the melting glacier landscape is undeniable.

In 2018 the highest point in Sweden changed, excessive heat in 2018 melted the South peak of the Kebnekaise mountain so the North peak is now Sweden’s highest point.

21/09/2018 When Records Melt featured in the Guardian

Image: Thjorsa River, Iceland, 2012, © Edward Burtynsky/Project Pressure

“Ed Burtynsky explores the water storage and transport systems that can be found in glaciers, focusing on how they release water into the world’s river systems. The resulting images depict the beauty and monumental scale of the meltwater runoff. Burtynsky reminds us of what we are losing as glaciers continue to diminish across the globe.”

See the full gallery here.

When Records Melt exhibition with contributing artists Michael Benson (DE), Adam Broomberg (ZA) & Oliver Chanarin (UK), Edward Burtynsky (CA), Peter Funch (DK), Noémie Goudal (FR), Simon Norfolk (NG), Christopher Parsons (UK) and Klaus Thymann (DK).

21/09/2018 New Scientist Review

Review of Project Pressure’s exhibition When Records Melt in the New Scientist magazine.

“Visit the Rhône Glacier in southern Switzerland, and you are more than likely to wander past a small shop. It’s worth a visit: the owners have carved out an ice grotto, and charge tourists for the eerie and beautiful experience of exploring the inside of their glacier’s mass of blue ice.

Now, though, it’s melting. The grotto is such an important part of their livelihood, some years ago the owners invested 100,000 euros in a special thermal blanket. “It’s kept about 25 metres’ depth of ice from disappearing and has kept the grotto in business,” explains the photographer Simon Norfolk. But a few winters on the mountain have left the blanket in tatters.

“It’s the gesture that fascinates me,” says Norfolk. “There is something insane about trying to reverse the inevitable – a gesture as forlorn and doomed as the glacier itself.”

Norfolk and fellow photographer Klaus Thymann climbed up to the grotto just before dawn, armed with a light attached to a helium balloon that cast a sepulchral light over the scene. “I wanted to recreate the same light you get over a mortuary slab,” Norfolk says.

Emilia van Lynden, artistic director of Unseen Amsterdam, finds the effect as aesthetically chilling as it is beautiful. Of the whole series, called Shroud, she observes: “We’re seeing a glacier being wrapped and prepared for death.”

Deeper pleasures
“There’s next to no photo-journalism here,” van Lynden explains. “None of the images here expect you to take them at face value. They expect you to pay attention and figure things out for yourself. These are works into which you need to invest a little bit of time and effort, to see what the artist is trying to tell you.” ”

Read the full story here