20/03/2018 PROJECT PRESSURE AT MUSEUM OF CLIMATE CHANGE, HONG KONG

Under the title Vanishing Glaciers, Project Pressure will be presented at the Jockey Club Museum of Climate Change – Hong Kong

Walking through the museum audiences can see photographs by the artists; Corey Arnold, Michael Benson, Scott Conarroe, Peter Funch, Simon Norfolk and Klaus Thymann.
The walls are covered in full height printed canvases with glacier images shown in a saloon style layout. As you walk through the museum you pass through the seven continents, experiencing all types of glaciers be that on top of volcanoes, tidal-glaciers connecting with the sea or classic valley glaciers.

Project Pressure will also present a new way of showing comparative images, the team worked with Erik Schytt Holmlund who sourced images from 1946, 1959, 1980 and 2017 of the Tarfala Valley, Sweden and using photogrammetry created 3D models with photorealistic surfaces. In a video journey we fly through the landscape as we fade between the years and see how the glaciers are retreating.

On March 22nd 2018 at 3pm Professor Fok Tai-fai, Pro-Vice-Chancellor and Vice-President, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, will introduce Vanishing Glaciers. This is followed by a keynote titled “Using art to communicate Climate Change” by Klaus Thymann, founder of Project Pressure.

Opening hours:
March 22nd – June 30th 2018.
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday to Saturday: 9:30 am – 5:00 pm.
Closed on Wednesday, Sunday, Public Holidays and University Holidays.

Address:
Jockey Club Museum of Climate Change
Yasumoto International Academic Park 8/F
The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong

25/10/2017 Tracking a century of glacial change

Klaus Thymann recently visited Helagsfjället, a mountain in Sweden, to document how the area’s ice has changed over time. The mountain is home to the most southern of Sweden’s many glaciers and is part of the Scandinavian Mountains. At 1797 metres above sea level, it’s the highest mountain in the country south of the Arctic Circle – but even at this altitude its glacier is shrinking.

The purpose of Thymann’s recent trip was to create an updated comparative image for Project Pressure’s archive collaboration with World Glacier Monitoring Service (WGMS) correspondent Per Holmlund. A glaciologist and professor in the Department of Physical Geography at Stockholm University, Dr Holmlund helped us locate a picture of Helags from 1908.

As he explains, “The 1908 pictures were taken by Fredrik Enquist who at that time was a student at Uppsala University. He had a grant from the Swedish Tourist Association to perform investigations of the glaciers in the Helags and Sylarna massif using terrestrial photogrammetry. The resulting maps, some of the photos and other information was published in a report at the Swedish geological survey in 1910. The areal change from 1908 until now is about 50% – which is significant. In general, Swedish glaciers have lost about 30% of their former extent.”

Above: the glacier’s retreat is clearly visible when comparing the images from 1908 and 2017 –
both are panoramic images stitched together from multiple exposures.

10/07/2017 Washington’s Glaciers Revisited

Mount Rainier (2016) by Peter Funch

Peter Funch has been making repeat visits to the Cascade Range in Washington’s National Park for the last 3 years. Commissioned by Project Pressure, his artwork takes inspiration from the wealth of historic postcards accumulated over the past century depicting this area. All his expeditions have been supported by charity sponsors Rab – they spoke to Funch about how his project has developed. Read the story and see more photos here.

04/07/2017 Crowd Funding with Art of Kindness

Art of Kindness is a new marketplace for art, where artists and collectors can discover, exhibit, buy, and sell art while giving to a cause they love. They are bringing an exciting group of artists, social impact partners, and patrons together on one platform. Check out their crowdfunding campaign and support them today.

12/06/2017 The Life and Death of a Glacier

Lhotse

Lhotse Glacier from the Island Peak trail with view of Lhotse and Lhotse Shar in the background by Christopher Parsons.

Charity sponsors Rab recently spoke to contributing artist and competition winner Christopher Parsons for their blog. In an expedition supported by The Glacier Trust Chris spent three weeks traversing the trails around Lhotse in the Sagarmatha region. Taking inspiration from the scientists he was travelling with he gathered samples from different areas of the glaciers to be cultured by a microbiologist on his return to the UK. The results will become part of his final artwork as he juxtaposes the microscopic with the macroscopic.

Glaciers in the Nepalese Himalayas have suffered significant decline in recent years with research suggesting there is as little as 50 years before deglaciation leads to a crisis in water availability (ICIMOD, 2017). This underlines the need to document these glaciers and highlight the impact of climate change before it is too late. Read The Life and Death of a Glacier on the Rab website.